Washington Nationals News: Injured Matt Belisle moving toward return

Mar 30, 2016; Port St. Lucie, FL, USA; Washington Nationals relief pitcher Matt Belisle (18) delivers a pitch in the fourth inning during a spring training game against the New York Mets at Tradition Field. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
Mar 30, 2016; Port St. Lucie, FL, USA; Washington Nationals relief pitcher Matt Belisle (18) delivers a pitch in the fourth inning during a spring training game against the New York Mets at Tradition Field. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports /
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Today’s District Daily features stories on injured Washington Nationals pitcher Matt Belisle and Wilson Ramos’ fast start to the 2016 season.

Good evening DoD readers, and welcome to today’s District Daily. Get caught up on the latest Nats news and opinions with some great Washington Nationals articles from around the web below.

In today’s Daily, the Washington Post’s Chelsea Janes discusses injured reliever Matt Belisle. As Janes notes, Belisle is working his way back from a calf injury that has had him out since April 27.

Belisle, who surprised many by making the Opening Day roster out of Spring Training, has been traveling with the team while he’s been on the disabled list.

Here’s what Belisle had to say about his recovery and why he appreciates being able to travel with the team, via Janes’ article:

"“I always look for opportunities that are camouflaged at times like this,” Belisle said. “If I can’t help the team physically, I think I can help from a strategy standpoint. I feel like I can really tighten up on scouting, or can help in the bullpen. If guys need any sort of info, I can do my best to be a good teammate.”"

Also in today’s Daily, MLB.com’s Bill Ladson discusses Wilson Ramos’ strong start to the season. As Ladson writes, Ramos underwent lasik surgery during Spring Training and his eyesight has improved, which he says has helped him at the plate this season.

Here’s what Ramos said about his improvement, via Ladson’s article:

"“The Lasik surgery helped me a lot,” Ramos said. “Since Spring Training, I recognize pitches really well — better than last year. Last year was an off year for me. But this year, I have been working a lot in the cage with [hitting coach] Rick Schu. We have been working together. I’ve been doing my drills. It has helped me a lot. I’m not swinging at bad pitches.”"

Be sure to check out both articles below, they’re definitely worth a read. And as always, stay tuned to DoD for all your Washington Nationals needs.

Nationals pitcher Matt Belisle moving toward return

(Chelsea Janes, Washington Post)

Matt Belisle will throw off a mound in the next couple days, the right-hander said Friday. The Nationals placed him on the disabled list April 27, after he broke to cover first base and felt pain in his right calf — the same one he had injured doing conditioning before spring training.

Belisle traveled with the team on its 10-game Midwest road trip and has been able to work daily with executive director of medical services Harvey Sharman. Sharman joined the Nationals’ medical staff after a long stint with Leeds United Football Club in England and therefore has particular expertise with calf injuries, which often afflict soccer players. Read full article here.

Ramos sees clearly now, off to fast start

(Bill Ladson, MLB.com)

WASHINGTON — Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos is not only having a great year behind the plate, he is also off to the best start of his career with the bat, going 32-for-88 (.364) with seven doubles, three home runs, 13 RBIs, a .404 on-base percentage and a .950 OPS before Friday’s 5-3 win over the Marlins. He was given the night off.

Getting Lasik eye surgery during Spring Training has worked wonders. Since he has been consistent in the batter’s box, Ramos has taken notice that opposing pitchers are throwing the ball around the plate. In fact, he is showing more patience lately, walking five times in five games. Ramos is not known as a patient hitter. Read full article here.