Washington Nationals: Five Takeaways From The Grapefruit League

rjuckett
Mar 24, 2017; West Palm Beach, FL, USA; Washington Nationals starting pitcher Jeremy Guthrie (80) hands the ball to manager Dusty Baker (12) and leaves the game against the St. Louis Cardinals during a spring training game at The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
Mar 24, 2017; West Palm Beach, FL, USA; Washington Nationals starting pitcher Jeremy Guthrie (80) hands the ball to manager Dusty Baker (12) and leaves the game against the St. Louis Cardinals during a spring training game at The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports /
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NATS DEEPER ON THE FARM

When the Nationals made their big trade at the Winter Meetings, many felt the cupboard of prospects remained too bare. As it will take years to determine of Adam Eaton for Reynaldo Lopez, Lucas Giolito and Dane Dunning is worth, the cupboard down on the farm is still well-stocked.

Fedde delivered two starts catching the eyes of fans and scouts. Austin Voth looked good early. Andrew Stevenson and Drew Ward showed the promise of seasons to come. After Matt Wieters moves on, Pedro Severino will do just fine as the Nationals catcher.

Given a chance to show their stuff, the kids did.

Although Brian Goodwin did not make the final team, Wilmer Difo expanded is versatility and pushed for the last roster spot out of nowhere. Koda Glover pitched himself on the team, possibly to close at some point.

To suggest the championship window closes soon is premature. As long as the farm system continues to develop major-league talent, the Nationals will spend what they can to contend. It might get choppy in the next few years, but it is clear potential turns to talent.

Starting pitching depth in the future is an issue, but outfield and infield talent is not. Starting with Trea Turner and the eventual arrival of Robles, the minor leagues are deep.

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