Washington Nationals: The State of the Nationals Bullpen

rshinberg
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 17: Sean Doolittle #63 of the Washington Nationals pitches in the ninth inning against the San Francisco Giants at Nationals Park on April 17, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 17: Sean Doolittle #63 of the Washington Nationals pitches in the ninth inning against the San Francisco Giants at Nationals Park on April 17, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images) /
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In Need of a Repair or Two

People that have followed my work over the last nine or so months know that I’m a big believer in what Wander Suero offers as a pitcher.  He can pitch multiple innings, and he strikes lots of batters out.  That’s an excellent combination to have.

His 6.60 ERA is due to an absurd 48.4 LOB%. That will NOT (I repeat, NOT) sustain itself over the course of the season.  That is why Suero’s FIP of 2.94 is a better representation of who he is.

Erick Fedde was recently recalled from Double-A and placed back in the bullpen.  Both he and Joe Ross offer long relief help when the starters struggle.  Fedde and Ross are serviceable pitchers.  And as awful as it sounds, the Nats need those guys badly.

Tony Sipp is the Nats’ best LOOGY (left-handed one-out guy) but is currently injured.  When he was healthy, he held left-handed batters to a scary .666 OPS.

Matt Grace is who he is.  Nothing flashy, but still somewhat effective.  He is suffering the same LOB% fate as Suero, so his 3.52 FIP, rather than his 6.75 ERA, is a better representation of his contributions to the team.

We’ve discussed seven good and mediocre pitchers.  If you’re still reading, prepare yourself for an adventure into horrible, horrible pitching stats.

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