Nationals: 3 former players Washington should avoid signing

Wilson Ramos #40 of the New York Mets celebrates after hitting a two-run home run in the third inning against the Washington Nationals during game 1 of a double header at Nationals Park on September 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by G Fiume/Getty Images)
Wilson Ramos #40 of the New York Mets celebrates after hitting a two-run home run in the third inning against the Washington Nationals during game 1 of a double header at Nationals Park on September 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by G Fiume/Getty Images) /
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Daniel Murphy has not played well since leaving the Washington Nationals.
Daniel Murphy #42 of the Colorado Rockies makes a play against the San Diego Padres at Coors Field on August 28, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. All players are wearing #42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day. The day honoring Jackie Robinson, traditionally held on April 15, was rescheduled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images) /

Daniel Murphy

How good was Daniel Murphy during his three years with the Washington Nationals? He was good.

In his All-Star campaign of 2016 he led the league in doubles and OPS while setting career highs in home runs and runs batted in. He hit .438 in the NLDS loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers.

There was a slight drop-off in year two, though not by much. Murphy hit .322 and led the league in doubles again. He hit 23 homers, drove in 93 runs and scored 94 times.

A knee injury limited Murphy in the final year of his contract and he was only able to play in 56 games. Not knowing if they wanted to be buyers or sellers at the trade deadline, the Nationals ultimately sent Murph to the Chicago Cubs for a minor league infielder (who was later flipped in the Yan Gomes trade). In limited time and with a bad knee, Murphy still hit .300 during his time in Washington that year.

After his short stint with the Cubs, Murphy landed with the Colorado Rockies after signing a two-year deal in free agency. His first year he hit .279 (with half his games at Coors Field), the second lowest batting average of his career. This year he hit .236 with an OPS of .608, both career lows.

Injuries derailed his 2019 season, ineffectiveness sent him to the bench to end his 2020 season.

Daniel Murphy turns 36 in April. He’s a broken down second basemen turned first basemen. Appreciate what you did in the past, but there won’t be a future for you in Washington.

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