Washington Nationals: MiLB Rule 5 Draft Results

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 11: General mananger Mike Rizzo of the Washington Nationals speaks to the media before game four of the National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on October 11, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 11: General mananger Mike Rizzo of the Washington Nationals speaks to the media before game four of the National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on October 11, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) /
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Washington was busy in the MiLB Rule 5 Draft, adding four players to their AAA roster.

With MLB’s lockout in full swing, the future of the Rule 5 Draft was up in the air. In the meantime, a MiLB rule five draft was held earlier today and the Nationals had the third overall pick.

Baseball America broke down the official rules and everything you need to know from today’s draft.

"That flipping of the expected schedule will lead to some knock-on effects. If a team has a full Triple-A roster of 38, it will not be allowed to select anyone in the MiLB portion of the Rule 5 draft (and once a team hits 38 it can no longer pick anyone else). If the MLB portion of the Rule 5 draft went first, any player picked in the MLB Rule 5 draft who was on the Triple-A roster would open up a roster spot in the MiLB Rule 5 draft.Unlike the MLB Rule 5 draft, there are no roster restrictions or other rules when it comes to MiLB Rule 5 picks. Once a player is selected, the selecting team pays $24,500 to the previous team and the player is added to the selecting club’s Triple-A roster. That Triple-A roster designation is simply a procedural move—the player can be assigned to play at any level in the minors by his new team and there are no other roster requirements."

Washington made four selections in the draft and by the time the fifth round rolled around, they had already reached the AAA roster limits. Fortunately for them, they were of the few teams to not have a single-player selected. For now, everyone taken will be sent to AAA and from there the Nats can choose where each player starts.

Round 1: Andrew Young, 2B (From Arizona)

Part of the haul sent to Arizona from St. Louis in the Paul Goldschmidt trade, Andrew Young struggled in his first taste of the Majors. He appeared in 58 games last year with the Diamondbacks, hitting .209, with six homers, 15 RBIs, and an OPS of .782.

However, he raked at AAA last year, slashing .304/.388/.598 with 11 homers, and 41 RBIs in 48 games. Despite playing the same position as Luis Garcia, Washington can always move the latter back to short, allowing for the 27-year-old to join the 26 man roster.

Young has already shown he has nothing left to prove at AAA and at this point just needs MLB experience.

Round 2: Curtis Taylor, RHP (From Toronto)

The second round saw Washington select reliever Curtis Taylor who was once on Toronto’s top 30 prospect list. Last year he posted a 4.21 ERA in 19 1/3 innings, with 16 strikeouts and eight walks. Washington’s bullpen is in desperate need of reinforcement and continues to be the team’s Achilles heel.

Round 3: Nationals: Matt Brill, RHP (From Arizona)

In the third round, Washington selected another Diamondback, this time reliever Matt Brill. Brill struggled last year at AA, posting a 6.33 ERA, with 37 strikeouts, and 20 walks in 27 innings.

Round 4: Dakody Clemmer, RHP (From Cleveland)

Rounding out the Nationals selections is Dakody Clemmer, a reliever from Cleveland. In 50 1/3 innings, he posted a 3.40 ERA, with 62 strikeouts, and 32 walks. He went 0-3 in save opportunities and needs to work on his command. Clemmer was the third straight reliever taken by Washington, showing how dire the team’s bullpen situation has become.

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